A credit agreement is a contract between a borrower and a lender that regulates the mutual commitments of each party. There are many types of credit agreements, including “facilities”, “revolvers”, “fixed-term loans”, “working capital loans”. Credit agreements are documented by a compilation of the various mutual commitments of the interested parties. – Credit agreements are much more detailed and contain detailed provisions on when and how the borrower will repay the credit and the types of penalties incurred if the borrower does not comply with the repayment. Credit agreements, like any agreement, reflect an “offer”, “acceptance of the offer”, a “counterparty” and can only include “legal” situations (a credit agreement with the sale of heroin drugs is not “legal”). Credit agreements are documented through their declarations of commitment, agreements that reflect the agreements concluded between the parties, a claim voucher and a guarantee contract (for example. B a mortgage or personal guarantee). The credit agreements offered by regulated banks are different from those offered by financial companies by giving banks a “bank charter” that is granted as a privilege and that contracts “public trust”. However, there are different subdivisions within these two categories, such as interest loans and balloon loans. It is also possible to sub-note whether the loan is a secured loan or an unsecured loan and whether the interest rate is fixed or variable. – Credit agreements are usually used when it comes to large sums of money, such as student loans, mortgages, car loans and commercial loans.

For smaller and/or informal loans, for example between family and friends, a debt voucher should be used. “investment banks” create credit agreements that meet the needs of the investors whose funds they wish to attract; “Investors” are always demanding and accredited organizations that are not subject to bank supervision and are subject to the need to respect public trust. Investment banking activities are supervised by the SEC and the focus is on whether the information is properly or correctly disclosed to the parties providing the funds. The credit agreements of commercial banks, savings banks, financial companies, insurance companies and investment banks are very different and all have a different purpose. “Commercial banks” and “savings banks”, because they accept deposits and benefit from FDIC insurance, generate credits that incorporate the concepts of “public trust”. Prior to intergovernmental banking, this “public trust” was easily measured by public banking supervisors, who were able to see how local deposits were used to finance the working capital needs of local industry and businesses and the benefits of using this organization. “Insurance institutions” that collect premiums for the provision of life or claims/accident insurance have established their own types of credit agreements.